MARCH: Book One

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MARCH: Book One (paperback)

by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin, and Nate Powell

AR Level 4.6, 1 point

 

Book One of the MARCH trilogy introduces us to John Lewis’s upbringing and entrance into the Civil Rights Movement.  Rep. Lewis was raised in the South on a farm.  He preached to the chickens while fighting for the chance to attend school and gain an education.  Others saw something in him and gave him the chance to use his skill and passion to meet Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and join the movement.  In this book, he stages peaceful sit-ins so African Americans could eat at food counters.

What I like about this book is it gives details on something I know bits and pieces about.  It is a graphic novel, and non-fiction, which is unusual.  It is a great way to retell history in a way that is not exactly entertaining, but engaging.  I want to make sure all of my students read this book so they learn about a part of history that is important, but not taught in detail.

What I didn’t like about this book isn’t something that can be helped.  Because of the context, there is a lot of language in this book.  I know the word nigger is one that is used in must my students listen to and their parents don’t blink an eye, but it different when I am providing a book that includes it.  It is important for them to see how this word was used and why it isn’t to be taken lightly.  I just worry that not everyone will see that, and I’ll have to take this valuable piece of literature out of my library.

Book 2 of Summer 2017!

Brown Girl Dreaming

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Brown Girl Dreaming (hardcover)

by Jacqueline Woodson

AR Level 5.3, 5 points

Brown Girl Dreaming is an award-winning book by a poet I’d never heard of.  I picked this book up, because I have to read all of the Newbery Award-winners and honorees.  It is autobiographical and follows the life of little Jacqueline from when she was a little girl in Ohio to her time in South Carolina with her grandparents, and then her life in New York.  Most takes place during the 1960’s when the Civil Rights Movement, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, The Black Panthers, etc. were in the news, and we get to see her perspective as a young black girl with roots in the north and the south.  In addition, we get to read about Ms. Woodson’s evolution as a young writer.  While this book delves into race and discrimination, it is very much about hope and faith and acceptance.

What I liked about this book was that it is written in poetry form.  I know my students will also appreciate that.  I will include it as a recommended read during my poetry unit at school, because while it tells a story, it is also a great example for figurative language and imagery.  I also like that the main character tells her story in a hopeful way, rather than being negative.  She doesn’t see her friends or others in terms of color, but she understands that she is isn’t treated equally, and has hope that she will someday.

What I didn’t like about this book was that it got a little slow at times.  I thought it would be a quick read, but it took me longer than expected.  I can’t really say it was the book’s fault.  Maybe I just lost focus in my pursuit of a lazy summer.

Book 8 of 40 (year 2)