Ramona Blue

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Ramona Blue (audiobook)

by Julie Murphy

 

Ramona is a high school senior in Eulogy, Mississippi, a small town on the gulf that was impacted by Katrina.  In fact, Ramona, her sister, and dad live in an old FEMA trailer in a trailer park.  They are very poor, and Ramona feels the financial burden when her older sister gets pregnant.  Ramona has always identified as lesbian, but she questions this when she falls for her best friend, who is a boy.  She and Freddy recently broke up with their girl friends and have rekindled their childhood friendship.  With a baby on the way, Ramona holds several jobs and thinks little of her own needs.  This story describes Ramona’s journey and all that she comes to terms with, whether it is her future outside of Eulogy, her sexual identity, her feelings for her family, or her long blue hair.

What I liked about this book was that Ramona is a character you feel compassion for.  You want the best for her, and you want others to treat her right.  Actually, most of the characters are well-written, and you feel like these are your friends.  I like books that appeal to my emotions.  I also appreciate books that make me think about things I cannot relate to so I can put myself into someone else’s shoes, and this definitely made me think.

What I didn’t like about this book was that I wanted to know more about Ramona’s future.  I guess there wasn’t really anything I disliked.  It was engaging and kept me reading.

Book 3 of summer 2017!

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We Are Okay

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We Are Okay (audiobook)

by Nina LaCour

 

Marin is a college freshman, and she is in her dorm for Winter Break.  Alone.  We slowly find out why- her mother is dead, she never knew her father, and she has no where to go.  Marin also struggles with her relationship with her friend Mabel, but we don’t immediately find out why, although we know that Marin and Mabel had an intimate relationship that ended.  LaCour flips back and forth between the present and the past, alternating chapters.  I love the way that was done.  It was effective and not at all confusing.

What I liked about this book was that it was beautifully written.  It was like reading a poem.  LaCour spent a lot of time going into detail in certain situations, and although it tended to be a quiet, almost depressing book, it didn’t make me want to stop reading, because the description was so beautiful.

What I didn’t like about this book was the character of Gramps.  It wasn’t her description of him.  He just really bothered me.  I can understand mental illness and depression, but I felt so sad that Marin was so lonely. I wanted her to have a good relationship with her grandfather.  I am not sure why this bothered me so much.

Book 56 of 40 (40 Book Challenge)